Writing A Ray Tracer in Go - Part 3

This is part 3 of my series on writing a ray/path tracer in Go. Checkout parts 1 and 2. I’m roughly following the e-book Ray Tracing in One Weekend, but translating all of the code into Go. All of the code for this post can be found on my Github. Last time I covered the basics of creating rays, spheres and calculating if a ray intersects a given sphere. In order to visualize our sphere, last time we colored a pixel red if a ray intersected it and some shade between blue and white if it did not. »

Writing A Ray Tracer in Go - Part 2

This is part 2 of my journey to try and write a ray/path tracer in Go. Checkout part 1 here. I’m roughly following the e-book Ray Tracing in One Weekend, but translating all of the code into Go. In the previous post we covered how a path tracer works and got an image to display on the screen by blending red, green and blue into a cool looking gradient. This time around we’ll draw a sphere instead, but by actually sending rays into the scene and marking the pixels where they hit the object. »

Writing a Ray Tracer in Go

I’ve been wanting to learn Go for awhile now. I bought a book, read several blogs and tutorials, but I still didn’t feel like I was really getting anywhere with the language. A few weeks ago I went with my a few of my co-workers to the Triangle Golang meetup hosted by my friend Brett, and met some great people. One of the guys demoed an amazing project he had worked on, building a ray tracer in Go. »